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By Lauren Harding, Eating Recovery Coach

The Facts

Dieting is linked to disordered eating attitudes and behaviors. Research shows that girls who diet are seven to eight times more likely to develop an eating disorder compared to those who do not diet. Furthermore, cross-cultural studies reveal an increase in eating disorders with an increase of urbanization. In Fiji, before television, dieting did not exist and there were no eating disorders. After television was introduced, Fijian women were for the first-time dieting, reportedly, as a way to “gain status”. Within 3 years 11% of these women reported vomiting in order to lose weight. “Without our cultural preoccupation with dieting, there would be no epidemic of eating disorders” (Gordon, 2000). An estimated 45 million Americans go on a diet each year, and Americans spend $33 billion each year on weight loss products. In 2017 the US dieting industry alone was worth $68.2 billion dollars. Yet, nearly two-thirds of Americans are classified as “obese”. With the increase of western civilization and dieting, there is also an increase of “obesity” and of eating disorders.

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Posted on February 15th, 2021 in Communication, Parenting by

Original article by Jennifer Thompson from Indy’s Child: https://issuu.com/indyschild/docs/0121-ic-issuu 

Happy.  Angry.  Frustrated.  Scared.  Excited.  These are just a few of the many emotions that cab be felt in a day.  It isn’t always easy to identify and articulate how we are feeling, and frustrations can build the more we feel misunderstood.  This can be ever more so for children with special needs.

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Posted on February 1st, 2021 in Eating Disorders by

The desire to lose weight is actually pretty normal due to the fact that we all live in a very weight focused and fatphobic society. The pressure to make our bodies look a certain way seems to have become our main purpose as humans. We are not born believing there is something wrong with our bodies, but overtime are conditioned to think that way.  Certain industries capitalize on these beliefs. We latch onto superficial cultural goals- like having a “good body”- to feel as though we have achieved something important. If we fail to achieve this ideal it tends to become more of a personal failure rather than a fault of the damaging message itself. These industries and messages promise us that once the “ideal body” is reached, that “everything will be better”.

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Posted on February 1st, 2021 in Eating Disorders, Mindfulness by

Eating Disorders- about the food or not about the food?

Eating disorders are both about the food and not about the food.

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Posted on February 1st, 2021 in Eating Disorders, Mindfulness by

Exercise can be a difficult thing to navigate during eating disorder recovery. I often find that clients struggle to differentiate between whether they are truly exercising for enjoyment or if they are exercising with eating disorder motives. There are a few ways to first identify if you have a dysfunctional relationship with exercise, and several steps to take in order to find balance and make peace with it once more.

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Posted on November 25th, 2020 in Eating Disorders by

Eating disorder recovery coaches assist clients in reaching their treatment goals in real life situations by providing ongoing support, challenges, and serving as both a role model and a guide. Coaching is an important aspect of treatment by accompanying clients in everyday situations as well as providing exposure and response prevention. Coaches are trained in how to best support a client in making day-to-day behavior changes necessary for recovery.

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Posted on November 24th, 2020 in Eating Disorders, Mindfulness by

Thanksgiving is of course a day where we practice gratitude.  But, for those healing from an eating disorder, gratitude is a powerful tool for sustained recovery best practiced every day.  Eating disorder behavior and thoughts often create a false sense of reality that steers us away from important, worthwhile aspects of our lives and personal identity.  Expressing gratitude intentionally for the non-eating disorder components of our lives reminds us that we are and will continue to be more than just our eating disorders.  Here are 4 ways to increase your expression of recovery gratitude:

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Posted on November 23rd, 2020 in Anxiety, Parenting by

Original article from Indy’s Child

Anyone else feel anxious? Given the current state of our reality, I am assuming that question would be met with a resounding “YES.”

So, what is anxiety anyway? Anxiety can be defined as a feeling of nervousness, worry or unease, typically about a future event or a situation with an uncertain outcome. Although uncomfortable, the purpose of anxiety is important and can often be helpful. Our experience of anxiety is natural and exists to alert us about possible future threats that might require a heightened state of vigilance. Anxiety can also act as a motivator, helping us to get out of bed in the morning or complete a task that’s been hanging over our head. But, when we notice anxiety persisting throughout our day, even when the possibility of threat has passed, it might be time for an emotional tune-up.

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Posted on September 8th, 2020 in Parenting by

You’re excited your kids are getting older and more independent, but you often reflect back on the days when you weren’t constantly hearing about the “drama” going on in 8th grade. It’s difficult to know what to do when every other day your daughter seems to have a new best friend and there’s continuous talk of “The Mean Girl”. Add on top of that the technology that teens have to deal with, it’s hard to figure out how to best support your child and ensure that they are handling all this interpersonal conflict in a positive way. Here are a few ideas of how to handle The Mean Girl and support your teen so you both can (hopefully) avoid wanting to rip your hair out.

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Posted on August 28th, 2020 in Anxiety, Communication, Parenting by

Original article from Indy’s Child

August is upon us, closing down those last bits of summer and pulling back the curtain for a brand-new school year. Here’s the truth though, there is only one thing about the future I can tell you for certain: this year will be different. By now, most of us have heard our school’s tentative back-to-school plan for the fall but given the fragility of certainty we have seen over the past few months, that “plan” might not feel so secure. As a parent, that makes me feel uncomfortable, and probably you too. You might have been a care-free, go with the flow kind of person before becoming a parent, but if you don’t agree that after having kids it’s best to have some sense of plan about the future, then you’re probably lying to yourself. For most people, uncertainty and ambiguity about their future is unsettling. And, if we adults are unsettled, I guarantee our kids are feeling it, too. Here are a few ideas about how best to navigate your family’s uncertainty bus through the new school year.

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Do you or your loved one need help navigating eating disorder treatment options?
Let us help you find the right direction at Northside Consulting »
COVID-19 Office Policy Update.
In an effort to keep both our clients and our staff healthy, all Northside Mental Health providers are now offering virtual appointments. Appointments can be scheduled directly with your provider or contact lindsey@northsidementalhealth.com.
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